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I HATE TO TELL YOU “I TOLD YOU SO” BUT “I TOLD YOU SO!”

 

 

crying out

Just as I was putting the last notes together on my October rosé article (to read that article click here [1]), saying for the umpteenth zillion time that rosés are not just for summer enjoyment, but for enjoyment all year round, look what came floating in from the CIVP/Provence Wine Council:

Provence Rosé Exports to the U.S. Continue to Soar Through First Half of 2015 as Summer Transitions to Fall

Ongoing consumer demand for dry rosé wine confirms the establishment of rosé as a third category of wine…

… Dynamic increases are reported for exports to the U.S. of rosé wines from Provence — the world’s rosé capital — with 53% growth on volume and 70% on value for the period July 2014 to June 2015 (source: CIVP/French Custom Data). Strong continuing growth reported on exports to the U.S. of rosé wines from Provence for the half year through September distribution confirms the establishment of rosé as an ongoing, year-round wine of choice for U.S. consumers.

The entire dry rosé wine category also continues to see dynamic growth in the United States, with the research firm Nielsen showing an increase of 41.1% on value and 34.3% on volume for imported rosés greater than $12 for the 52-week period ending July 4, 2015.

With Provence’s dry rosé wine — long heralded as the category’s gold standard — leading the way in export growth, the consumer trend towards selecting rosé as one of three wine categories (red, white, rosé) now is firmly established.  More than just a seasonal trend, the category increase represents an expansion rate more than 10 times that of total retail table wine sales (4.1% on value and 1.3% on growth) for the same period.  U.S. retail sales of imported rosé table wines priced $12 and above were compared to total table wine sales within the Nielsen food, drug, convenience store, mass merchandiser, chain and liquor markets for the 52-week period prior (data source: Nielsen).  All told, the continuing increase in exports accompanied by the growth in retail sales figures affirm that rosé wines continue to lead the development rate of the U.S. wine market all together.

In the French region of Provence, home of quality dry pink rosé wines and the world’s largest rosé specialty region, “increasing numbers of Provence rosé producers are bringing their wines into the U.S. market in response to increased demand here,” stated Eric Dufavet, Director of the CIVP/Provence Wine Council.  “Consequently, greater varieties of rosé wine styles and expanded distribution throughout the U.S. are the result.”

America’s top sommeliers agree that consumer demand is driving increased distribution.  According to Advanced Sommelier David Keck of Camerata at Paulie’s in Houston:  “We’ve definitely seen an increase in consumers requesting rosé from Provence, specifically.  In our establishment, to respond to that, we increased our offerings by about 200% and the category will continue to grow.”

Although light-bodied and refreshing, dry rosés from Provence are also praised as being diverse, complex and food friendly, and therefore suitable for almost every cuisine.  Master Sommelier Andy Myers from the “Think Food Group” notes that “The delicate, food friendly nature and the relatively lower level of alcohol are all features that attract guests.”

Reflecting the appealing culture and Mediterranean lifestyle so prevalent today, Provence rosé is considered by his customers to be the rosé category leader, according to Hakan Aktas, Advanced Sommelier at The Quarter NYC:  “We only have Provence rosé on my wine list.”  And Master Sommelier Chris Tanghe of Vinum Wine Importing concurs that “Provence rosé is considered to be the gold standard of the rosé world.  It’s definitely the first thing I think of when I am talking about Provence.”                                                               

Provence, the oldest winegrowing area in France, is the world’s largest rosé specialty region, with rosé making up over 88% of Appellation d’Origine Protégée wine production. 

The Conseil Interprofessionnel des Vins de Provence (CIVP), known in the United States as the Provence Wine Council, is an organization representing more than 600 wine producers and 40 trade companies from the Provence region of France.  Its mission is to promote and advance the wines of the region’s principal appellations.  The organization’s members together produce 96 percent of Provence’s Appellation d’Origine Protégée (AOP) wines. More information can be found online  at http://www.winesofprovence.com/ [2]

So there you have it. Provence rosés are being enjoyed year round. And this is something you can take to the bank!

In Vino Veritas,Sig

John Tilson